A Hard Day's Night - The Beatles and Pattie Boyd, 1964A Hard Day’s Night is the first movie starring the Beatles. It was filmed and released in 1964. Here are a few trivia questions related to the film. The answers are below the last question.

(1) How many times is the name “Beatles” mentioned in A Hard Day’s Night?

(2)  The movie has a character of a grandfather to which Beatle?

(3) Name the Beatle and his future wife that met on the set of A Hard Day’s Night.

(4) What is the only word that Pattie Boyd says in the film?

(5) The movie’s title originated from something said by which Beatle?

(6) What 13 year old child actor, who would later become a famous drummer/vocalist, was an extra in A Hard Day’s Night?

(7) Besides A Hard Day’s Night, what other Beatles’ films did actor Victor Spinetti appear in?

(8) What did Ringo reply when asked if he’s a Mod or a Rocker?

(9) Who directed A Hard Day’s Night?

(10) In the scene where The Beatles are running and playing in the field, a body double filled in for which Beatle who wasn’t actually there?

Answers:

(1) Zero – No one says the word “Beatles”

(2)  Paul. Wilfrid Brambell played Paul’s fictional grandfather John McCartney

(3) George Harrison and Pattie Boyd

(4) “Prisoners?”

(5) Ringo. As he explained in an interview with DJ Dave Hull in 1964: “We went to do a job, and we’d worked all day and we happened to work all night. I came up still thinking it was day I suppose, and I said, ‘It’s been a hard day…’ and I looked around and saw it was dark so I said, ‘…night!’ So we came to A Hard Day’s Night.”

(6) Phil Collins. Phil is wearing glasses and can be seen in the audience at the television theater. On a side note, in 1970, at age 19, Collins played percussion on the George Harrison song “The Art of Dying”.

(7) Help! and Magical Mystery Tour

(8) “I’m a mocker”

(9) Richard Lester

(10) John, who was away promoting his book “John Lennon: In His Own Write.” Some close-up shots of him were later edited into the scene.

Wonderwall Music CoverGeorge Harrison was the first Beatle to release a solo album with Wonderwall Music, the soundtrack to the film Wonderwall. The album was released on November 1, 1968, and was nearly all instrumental. The tracks were recorded in December 1967 in England, and in January 1968 in Bombay, India.

Among the several musicians appearing on the album were Ringo Starr and Eric Clapton using the pseudonyms Richie Snare and Eddie Clayton, respectively. Peter Tork of The Monkees played a banjo borrowed from Paul McCartney, though Tork was not credited.

All of the tracks were composed by Harrison, and it was the first album to be released on the newly formed Apple Records label. Later it would become the first Apple record to be deleted from their catalog, though it was remastered and reissued on compact disc in 1992.

In the UK, Wonderwall Music did not chart at all. In the U.S., it reached #49 in the early part of 1969.

Paul McCartney in Lagos drumming on Band on the RunThe drummer on Wings’ 1973 album ‘Band on the Run’ was none other than Paul McCartney. Paul and his wife Linda were bored with recording in the UK, and decided they wanted to try a studio in a different locale. From a list of EMI’s international recording studios, they chose Lagos in Nigeria as the place to record the ‘Band on the Run’ album. In addition to the McCartneys, guitarist/pianist/vocalist Denny Laine, lead guitarist Henry McCullough and drummer Denny Seiwell were scheduled for the trip. However, a few weeks before departing, McCullough quit Wings in Scotland and Seiwell quit the night before the departure. This left only the core members, Paul, Linda and Denny Laine, to go to Lagos and record the album as a trio. Without a drummer, McCartney took it upon himself to handle the drumming duties.

This was by no means the first time Paul had played drums on a recording. He played all of the drums on his 1970 ‘McCartney’ solo album as well as on a few Beatles songs including “The Ballad of John & Yoko”, “Back in the USSR”, and “Dear Prudence”.

Queen Elizabeth II decorated the Beatles with Order of British Empire 1965Running just 23 seconds long, “Her Majesty” is the shortest song in the Beatles official catalog. It was originally to be placed between “Mean Mr. Mustard” and “Polythene Pam” on their Abbey Road album. Paul McCartney decided that the sequence didn’t work and the song was edited out of the medley by studio tape operator John Kurlander. Kurlander placed the edited out song after fourteen seconds of lead out tape at the end of the Abbey Road master tape. The original intention was to not have “Her Majesty” appear on the album, but they liked the “accident” and decided to keep it.

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