A Hard Day's Night - The Beatles and Pattie Boyd, 1964A Hard Day’s Night is the first movie starring the Beatles. It was filmed and released in 1964. Here are a few trivia questions related to the film. The answers are below the last question.

(1) How many times is the name “Beatles” mentioned in A Hard Day’s Night?

(2)  The movie has a character of a grandfather to which Beatle?

(3) Name the Beatle and his future wife that met on the set of A Hard Day’s Night.

(4) What is the only word that Pattie Boyd says in the film?

(5) The movie’s title originated from something said by which Beatle?

(6) What 13 year old child actor, who would later become a famous drummer/vocalist, was an extra in A Hard Day’s Night?

(7) Besides A Hard Day’s Night, what other Beatles’ films did actor Victor Spinetti appear in?

(8) What did Ringo reply when asked if he’s a Mod or a Rocker?

(9) Who directed A Hard Day’s Night?

(10) In the scene where The Beatles are running and playing in the field, a body double filled in for which Beatle who wasn’t actually there?

Answers:

(1) Zero – No one says the word “Beatles”

(2)  Paul. Wilfrid Brambell played Paul’s fictional grandfather John McCartney

(3) George Harrison and Pattie Boyd

(4) “Prisoners?”

(5) Ringo. As he explained in an interview with DJ Dave Hull in 1964: “We went to do a job, and we’d worked all day and we happened to work all night. I came up still thinking it was day I suppose, and I said, ‘It’s been a hard day…’ and I looked around and saw it was dark so I said, ‘…night!’ So we came to A Hard Day’s Night.”

(6) Phil Collins. Phil is wearing glasses and can be seen in the audience at the television theater. On a side note, in 1970, at age 19, Collins played percussion on the George Harrison song “The Art of Dying”.

(7) Help! and Magical Mystery Tour

(8) “I’m a mocker”

(9) Richard Lester

(10) John, who was away promoting his book “John Lennon: In His Own Write.” Some close-up shots of him were later edited into the scene.

Nowhere Man / What Goes On singleThe first Beatles song to give Ringo Starr co-writing credit was “What Goes On”, though Ringo jokingly claimed he contributed “about five words, and I haven’t done a thing since.” The writing credit is attributed to Lennon/McCartney/Starkey, with Ringo using his real name of Richard Starkey. The credits in the first pressing of the single accidentally omitted “Starkey”.

The origins of “What Goes On” actually date back years earlier to the Quarrymen days when John Lennon started the original version of the song. It was later resurrected in 1965 and completed with the help of Paul McCartney and Starr.

The song appeared on ‘Rubber Soul’ (the UK version) and ‘Yesterday and Today’ in the US. It was also the B-side to the “Nowhere Man” single.

Julian Lennon and John LennonJulian Lennon made his musical debut at age 11 playing drums on his father’s first studio version of “Ya-Ya”. The 1974 recording would appear as the last track on John Lennon’s  ‘Walls and Bridges’ album. This short, casual version of the song features just Julian on drums, and John on piano and vocals.

May Pang later recalled that Julian was disappointed when he found out the recording would make the ‘Walls and Bridges’ album, telling his father “If I’d known, I would have played better”.

“Ya-Ya” was originally performed by Lee Dorsey in 1961 and later covered again by John in a full length version on his “Rock ‘n’ Roll” album.

Click the Play button to hear the version with Julian:

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Paul McCartney carrying a young Julian LennonOriginally titled “Hey Jules”, Paul McCartney wrote “Hey Jude” in an attempt to comfort Julian Lennon, John and Cynthia’s son, during their divorce. In 1968, John and Cynthia Lennon separated due to his affair with Yoko Ono. Sometime after this, McCartney drove out to visit Julian and Cynthia. Later, Cynthia recalled, “I was truly surprised when, one afternoon, Paul arrived on his own. I was touched by his obvious concern for our welfare…. On the journey down he composed ‘Hey Jude’ in the car. I will never forget Paul’s gesture of care and concern in coming to see us.”

About the original title of the song, Paul McCartney said, “I started with the idea ‘Hey Jules’, which was Julian, don’t make it bad, take a sad song and make it better. Hey, try and deal with this terrible thing. I knew it was not going to be easy for him. I always feel sorry for kids in divorces … I had the idea [for the song] by the time I got there. I changed it to ‘Jude’ because I thought that sounded a bit better.”

It would be almost twenty years after McCartney wrote the song that Julian would discover that it had been written for him. He remembered being closer to McCartney than to his own father: “Paul and I used to hang about quite a bit—more than Dad and I did. We had a great friendship going and there seems to be far more pictures of me and Paul playing together at that age than there are pictures of me and my dad.”