Ringo Starr, Barbara Bach, Paul McCartney, Linda McCartney in 1981 at Starr's & Bach's weddingLinda Louise Eastman and Barbara Bach were in attendance at the famous Beatles’ August 15th, 1965 concert at Shea Stadium in New York. Though they didn’t know it at the time, Linda would later marry Paul McCartney (March 12, 1969), and Barbara would go on to marry Ringo Starr (April 27, 1981).

Back in August 1965, the soon to be 18 year old Barbara Bach was not really a Beatles fan. She was only in attendance at the Shea Stadium concert as a chaperone to her younger sister Marjorie. Barbara preferred the music of Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin, and Ray Charles.

In contrast, Linda Eastman was there as a fan. Paul McCartney said, “Linda was also there — but as she was a real music fan she was quite (annoyed) with everyone screaming. I think she enjoyed the experience, but she genuinely wanted to hear the show. That wasn’t the deal though. Not then.”

See also: Where did Ringo Starr first meet his wife Barbara Bach?

Barbara Bach and Ringo Starr in the film CavemanRingo Starr and actress Barbara Bach first met on the set of the film Caveman in February 1980. They married just over a year later on April 27, 1981, shortly after the film’s release.

Ringo and Barbara were dating and spending a holiday together in December 1980, when the news broke about the murder of John Lennon. The couple flew to New York to comfort John’s widow, Yoko, and the Lennon’s son Sean.

Over the years, Bach has appeared in some of Starr’s music videos, and has accompanied him on his tours. She also appears with Ringo in Paul McCartney’s 1984 film Give My Regards to Broad Street.

Just before her 18th birthday, Barbara was in attendance at the famous Beatles’ August 1965 concert at Shea Stadium in New York. Not really a Beatles fan, she was only there as a chaperone to her younger sister Marjorie, as Barbara preferred the music of Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles, and Bob Dylan. Coincidentally, another future Beatle wife, Linda Eastman, was also at the Shea Stadium concert.

George Harrison and John Lennon having a laugh in Shea Stadium“All Those Years Ago” is a George Harrison song that was a tribute to the then recently assassinated John Lennon. It was released May 11, 1981, five months after Lennon’s death. The recording of the song featured all three remaining former Beattles (Harrison, Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney). It is one of only a few non-Beatles songs to feature those three in the lineup. Paul, with his wife Linda and their Wings bandmate Denny Laine, contributed backing vocals on the recording.

The writing and recording of the song actually began before Lennon’s death. George originally wrote the song with different lyrics for Ringo to record. Starr recorded it but felt the vocal range was too high for him to sing and he didn’t care for the lyrics. Harrison kept the track, and after John’s death, he rewrote the words to pay tribute to his friend and former bandmate. The song makes reference to a couple of Lennon compositions, “All You Need is Love” and “Imagine”.

The song went to #1 on the American adult contemporary chart. This was Harrison’s first #1 on this chart as a solo artist.

“All Those Years Ago” is available on the new CD compilation Let It Roll: Songs by George Harrison.

Paul McCartney in Lagos drumming on Band on the RunThe drummer on Wings’ 1973 album ‘Band on the Run’ was none other than Paul McCartney. Paul and his wife Linda were bored with recording in the UK, and decided they wanted to try a studio in a different locale. From a list of EMI’s international recording studios, they chose Lagos in Nigeria as the place to record the ‘Band on the Run’ album. In addition to the McCartneys, guitarist/pianist/vocalist Denny Laine, lead guitarist Henry McCullough and drummer Denny Seiwell were scheduled for the trip. However, a few weeks before departing, McCullough quit Wings in Scotland and Seiwell quit the night before the departure. This left only the core members, Paul, Linda and Denny Laine, to go to Lagos and record the album as a trio. Without a drummer, McCartney took it upon himself to handle the drumming duties.

This was by no means the first time Paul had played drums on a recording. He played all of the drums on his 1970 ‘McCartney’ solo album as well as on a few Beatles songs including “The Ballad of John & Yoko”, “Back in the USSR”, and “Dear Prudence”.