George Harrison and Pattie Boyd on A Hard Day's Night setGeorge Harrison and Pattie Boyd met during the filming of A Hard Day’s Night in 1964. Pattie appeared (uncredited) in the film as a schoolgirl. She spoke a one-word line in the film: “Prisoners?”.

Pattie initially resisted George’s interest in her (because she had a boyfriend at the time), but his persistence paid off and they married less than two years after meeting. Their marriage took place on January 21, 1966, with Paul McCartney as best man. Ringo Starr and John Lennon were on holiday and therefore not in attendance.

Harrison and Boyd split up in 1974. She moved in with George’s close friend Eric Clapton, whom was deeply infatuated with Pattie. Clapton and Boyd eventually married in 1979 (and divorced in 1989).

Pattie has claimed that she was the inspiration for Harrison’s songs “I Need You”, “Something”, “For You Blue” and “Isn’t It a Pity.” She has said that George was the love of her life, and that she regretted not working things out with him in their marriage.

A Hard Day's Night - The Beatles and Pattie Boyd, 1964A Hard Day’s Night is the first movie starring the Beatles. It was filmed and released in 1964. Here are a few trivia questions related to the film. The answers are below the last question.

(1) How many times is the name “Beatles” mentioned in A Hard Day’s Night?

(2)  The movie has a character of a grandfather to which Beatle?

(3) Name the Beatle and his future wife that met on the set of A Hard Day’s Night.

(4) What is the only word that Pattie Boyd says in the film?

(5) The movie’s title originated from something said by which Beatle?

(6) What 13 year old child actor, who would later become a famous drummer/vocalist, was an extra in A Hard Day’s Night?

(7) Besides A Hard Day’s Night, what other Beatles’ films did actor Victor Spinetti appear in?

(8) What did Ringo reply when asked if he’s a Mod or a Rocker?

(9) Who directed A Hard Day’s Night?

(10) In the scene where The Beatles are running and playing in the field, a body double filled in for which Beatle who wasn’t actually there?

Answers:

(1) Zero – No one says the word “Beatles”

(2)  Paul. Wilfrid Brambell played Paul’s fictional grandfather John McCartney

(3) George Harrison and Pattie Boyd

(4) “Prisoners?”

(5) Ringo. As he explained in an interview with DJ Dave Hull in 1964: “We went to do a job, and we’d worked all day and we happened to work all night. I came up still thinking it was day I suppose, and I said, ‘It’s been a hard day…’ and I looked around and saw it was dark so I said, ‘…night!’ So we came to A Hard Day’s Night.”

(6) Phil Collins. Phil is wearing glasses and can be seen in the audience at the television theater. On a side note, in 1970, at age 19, Collins played percussion on the George Harrison song “The Art of Dying”.

(7) Help! and Magical Mystery Tour

(8) “I’m a mocker”

(9) Richard Lester

(10) John, who was away promoting his book “John Lennon: In His Own Write.” Some close-up shots of him were later edited into the scene.

Klaus Voormann with the Beatles Revolver album and his Grammy awardThe cover illustration for the Revolver album was created by artist and bassist Klaus Voormann. German-born Voormann was a friend of the Beatles, dating back to their early days when they played at the Star Club in Hamburg, Germany. In 1966, Voormann was asked by John Lennon to design the album sleeve for Revolver. Klaus came up with a “scrapbook collage” for the cover. The band and their manager, Brian Epstein, loved the result. Voormann was paid £40 for the design. He would later receive a Grammy Award for Best Album Cover, Graphic Arts for this work.

Over 20 years later, Voormann would design the cover art for George Harrison’s 1988 single, “When We Was Fab”. This design included the image of Harrison from the Revolver cover along with an updated drawing in the same style.

In 1995, Voormann designed the covers for The Beatles Anthology albums for Apple Records. He, and fellow artist Alfons Kiefer, painted the covers.

Klaus was the bassist for the British band Manfred Mann, and later a session player and record producer. He occasionally played bass with some of the ex-Beatles’, either for studio recordings or live performances, and was a member of John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s Plastic Ono Band.

My Sweet Lord - Geroge Harrison single 1971The first single by an ex-Beatle to reach number one was “My Sweet Lord” by George Harrison. Released in November 1970 in the US, and January 1971 in the UK, the song reached number one on the charts in both countries, as well as in a few others.

“My Sweet Lord” appeared on Harrison’s number one hit triple album All Things Must Pass. George wrote the song in December 1969, while he and Billy Preston were in Copenhagen, Denmark. Originally intended as a song for Preston, Billy’s version appeared on his album Encouraging Words. He had a minor hit with the single in early 1970.

Harrison was involved in a lengthy legal battle due to musical similarities between “My Sweet Lord” and The Chiffons’ song “He’s So Fine”. A U.S. federal court decision in the case found that Harrison “subconsciously” copied the earlier song. He had to surrender the majority of royalties from “My Sweet Lord” and a cut of royalties from his All Things Must Pass album. In something of a twist, George would eventually buy the rights to “He’s So Fine”.

After George Harrison’s death from cancer in late 2001, “My Sweet Lord” reached number one again on the UK charts when it was reissued in January 2002.